Important – This blog post is no substitute for professional advice from a registered medical practitioner, and is offered “for your information only”. If you believe that you are genuinely suffering from depression, then contact a healthcare professional.

One of the most common ways in which laziness transcends every day life is when it manifests as symptoms of depression.

It’s a well-known fact that depression can result in you feeling unmotivated, unenergetic, and basically lazy. In fact, this is one of the most frequently reported symptoms of depression by those who suffer from its horrible effects.

It can be difficult to tell laziness and depression apart. So how can you answer the question “am I depressed or just lazy?”

In this blog post we will cover the biggest fundamental difference between depression and laziness. This isn’t a massive blog post, and is just designed to give you a basic rundown of what you need to know.

Remember that this blog post is not intended to serve as a substitute for proper medical advice, so please ensure that if you do feel you are depressed, you seek proper medical advice from a registered professional!

When it comes to determining if you are depressed or just lazy, there is one very useful “yardstick” you can use to measure yourself:

If your symptom of laziness manifests in such a way that you don’t do productive things (i.e. your work/study/chores/whatever) but you still get pleasure from sitting around and doing “lazy stuff” – watching tv, reading books, playing video games etc – then you are just having a problem with laziness.

The solution to this problem? You just need to force yourself to take action and do something! The best solution to laziness is actually taking action – as you will see here.

However, if you feel that your laziness is borne out of a lack of enjoying life … as in you feel down to the point where you cannot do anything, then you are more likely to have depression.

Fundamentally, laziness is really just another form of procrastination. It’s a feeling of not wanting to do anything because you have a disposition against taking action, which is probably caused by some external stimuli. Laziness can therefore be cured by getting up and doing something productive – by forcing yourself to take action. Depression, on the other hand, sucks the enjoyment and pleasure from your life, thereby rendering it almost impossible to take action.

So if you are feeling depressed, or if you are just feeling lazy, think about the differences outlined above. If you just find it hard to get stuff done, but tend to “enjoy” your excessive leisure time, then you need to learn how to beat procrastination and start taking action. On the other hand, if you feel so blue that you actually cannot effectively do anything, then you may be suffering from depression (in which case you should seek professional medical advice).

If you do think that you are suffering more from genuine laziness/procrastination, then I recommend you start your journey to recovery by reading my epic 40 ways to stop procrastinating blog post.